Feeds:
Posts
Comments

There are many things afoot in Berwickshire, twisting with the turning of time and spreading thin tendrils of dread throughout the land. The White Star Orcs are weakened with the loss of one of their leaders and the scattering of his tribes, the Black Princes have fallen eerily silent and in the dead of night adventurers are being sent dreams by the Lord of Death expressing that his patience is slowly coming to an end.

And so, on a warm summer morning the adventurers of Berwickshire and travellers from the Valley set out to try and set things to right in the county before it is too late …

Continue Reading »

The White Star Orcs have swept across Berwickshire, roaming bands of foul spawn forming a new and common threat to the travellers, traders and wanderers of the county. So, when a group of foul spawn are spotted lingering on the road west of Durholme, someone has to do something about it.

Tasked by Warden Rupert Tallow of the Newcroft Foresters, a band of adventurers set forth from Durholme on foot to put these beasts to rout and recover anything unusual from a small ruined library at Corroncrest.

Continue Reading »

Shields in my opinion are a fantastically useful prop/piece of kit to carry in a larp system. You can a) use it to defend your weaker side/legs, b) they look good alone, c) they look good in a group, especially if you’re practised at getting a solid shield wall together, d) they can show your allegiance and e) can show part of your character’s personality. However, I can understand that whilst being able to change your character is a relatively simple matter, changing the symbols on your kit is not – especially if you had a custom paint job done on your shield.

Therefore, I present to you the way I make my shield covers. Whilst this tutorial focuses on a round shield, it can be adapted to suit any shield size/shape/curvature so long as you’re willing to accept a bit of bagginess in the cloth cover.

I have seen many ways of making, fastening and decorating shield covers, but I use the method described below as the covers are easy to slip on and off for washing/changing between playing and monstering, and I can normally make one of these over a couple of evenings after work. I have been known to make and decorate some in a day when I’ve avoided the dreaded procrastination …

Continue Reading »

Summer is well on the way and with the lengthening days the foulspawn threat of the White Star is gaining a foothold. Broken by the stalwart defence of the Griffin Order earlier this year the foulspawn have halted their push south but threaten the settlement of Nelfarig and the Dwarven Kingdom of Dun Mhurdo. With this threat at the forefront of the adventurer’s minds, the news that prices for arms and armour are rising has been met with dismay. The reason? The Blacksmith’s stocks of ore and coal seem to be running dry.

And whilst the foulspawn threat may be blockading the usual shipments of worked ore from Dun Mhurdo and the mines to the west of the country may be a cause for a shortage, there are rumours of abandoned workings, of dwarves being paid to not work, and adventurers have found mine entrances collapsed or infested with creatures. The scale of this, and the lingering possibility of a call to muster by the new Thane Luyton, has set the resident adventuring blacksmith on the warpath. With the Mithamese down at the “Mithamese” docks proving to be slippery to catch in a lie, obtaining a sample of their “oluthen” ore has led to the suspicion that the Mithamese have gotten their hands on Berwickshire resources and selling it back masquerading as something else. But without proof nothing can be done.

And so, once a long discussion was had with the head of the local blacksmith’s guild, Wren was sent off on an excursion to the mines near Dun Mhurdo to see what was going on. Another group, led by Captain Christo, went hunting the Golden Goblin to strike at the leadership of the White Star.

Continue Reading »

The final section of my “how-to” series on tabards covers how I construct my “reversible” tabards and some alternative ways to customise the standard template. These are typically made for knights in the Fools and Heroes system, but could be used to make useful monster tabard combinations e.g. guards and foresters, guards and noble militia, noble militia of two houses etc.

The reversible tabards build on the techniques described in Part Two, so you might want to have a quick read here first before continuing on.

Continue Reading »

In continuation of the previous section of this “how-to” series on tabards, today we shall be looking into how I construct my “single ply” tabards with the shoulder seam. These are my more commonly found amongst my monster kit staples to use up cloth or work with smaller pieces of cloth that won’t accommodate the simple “single piece” tabard discussed in Part One.

In Part One my thoughts on materials and equipment for making tabards have been shared, so rather than repeating myself I shall link you here and jump straight into the how-to. But first a quick word on some cloth terms.

 

Continue Reading »

In trying to keep updating the website every week (trying being the key word in that sentence) I have decided to try writing a set of posts to act as filler material between LARP events when there is nothing to write up about.

A few people have asked how I make my tabards, particularly my reversible ones, so I thought I would attempt to write a “how-to” guide for you.

In this part I will talk through some of my thoughts on materials and equipment, and about making a single sheet tabard for monster purposes. In future parts I will talk about making single tabards with shoulder seams, reversible tabards and how I decorate my tabards with felt.

There are many wonderful people out amongst the crafty communities on the internet who have made tutorials and videos on how to do different stitches or garment construction with patterns/no-patterns amongst other sewing/crafty things. If in doubt, as I’m not so good at photographing my steps (and will be resorting to diagrams to illustrate my explanations below), I suggest you go and google it.

Continue Reading »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 292 other followers